pile of thin white circles of sacramental bread
Eucharist

Bread of Heaven

Mark 1:12-15

First Sunday in Lent

With the Gospel Acclamation today, the faithful hear this verse, Matthew 4:4, One does not live on bread alone, but on every word that comes forth from the mouth of God.” We take this to mean earthly bread, our sustenance that fuels us for our daily tasks. However, last year, many of us went without heavenly bread for months at a time. Maybe you can’t receive the Eucharist now because you don’t have access to in-person Mass, or you are avoiding the church building due to health concerns. 

I went without the Bread of Heaven for three and a half months in 2020, and one of the first times I received the Eucharist after churches re-opened in New York, was at my daughter’s First Holy Communion. Not only was I receiving Jesus’ Body and Blood again, I was finally receiving this gift again in communion with my Church family and sharing this precious gift with my young daughter. 

Anticipation of the Banquet

We anticipated this special moment for weeks, carefully preparing ourselves. I’m not simply talking about reviewing sacramental prep lessons, rehearsing hand placement for receiving the Body of Christ, ironing her dress, and fluffing her veil. Our preparation included the Sacrament of Penance. Our family, away for the Eucharist for months, hungering as we watched Mass on TV and recited the “Prayer for Spiritual Communion” in unison in our living room, approached the healing sacrament together the day before the first in-person Mass. Not only had we been away from the Body of Christ for months, we had been lacking His sacrament of mercy. Anticipating this joyful reunion, I was determined that the souls of each of my family members would be clean and whole tabernacles for Jesus, present in the Holy Eucharist. 

That was at the end of June. Today, I have the opportunity to receive Jesus every day. However, I’ve noticed that I’m not always as attentive to my mental and spiritual state as I was when I was in the desert last year. 

Lent is an Invitation Renewed

This Lent, Jesus is offering us a new opportunity to come back to him with our whole hearts. This season invites us to stop, reassess, and reconnect with the one who loves us and sacrificed all for us. We are still living lives of daily uncertainty. Everything is not back to normal. However, just as the angels ministered to Jesus in the desert, God sends His angels to tend to us in hard times (Ps. 91:11). Do we trust this? Do we recognize that our Lord, like us in every way but sin, understands hardship, dryness, uncertainty (Heb. 4:15)? 

When we are surrounded by the wild beasts of illness, instability, financial hardship, and even the Bread of Life is inaccessible to us, the Word of God “is living and effective, sharper than any two-edged sword, penetrating even between soul and spirit, joints and marrow, and able to discern reflections and thoughts of the heart” (Heb. 4:12). Let us reflect on the scripture and permit it to draw us closer to Jesus, the Word become flesh (John 1: 14), our sustainer, redeemer, and brother.

Nancy Belmont

Meditation

How can you be more intentional in your preparation to receive the Eucharist?

Lent Devotional 2021
A devotional for Lent 2021 with daily Gospel Reflections Download HERE
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Bible, Gospel, Lent, Liturgical Living, Uncategorized

Beyond the Day Spa – to a Hospital for Sinners

Luke 5:27-32

We all love a good cliché, even one about the Church. A quote attributed Saint Augustine comes to mind here: “The church is not a hotel for saints, it is a hospital for sinners.” I’ve heard this said a number of ways and used in a number of circumstances. Today’s Gospel could probably be pointed to as its origin. Here Jesus says, “Those who are healthy do not need a physician, but the sick do.” Jesus said this after He was questioned as to why He would “eat and drink with tax collectors and sinners”. 

What you do to the least…

Ministering to those who are untouchable, or undesirable is not attractive to most of us. If we are honest, we feel most comfortable ministering in socially comfortable and acceptable situations. Jesus was challenged many times for socializing with or ministering to those seen as “less than” or “unclean”. 

But did the fact that Jesus served everyone from leper, to adulterer mean that he was a “live and let live” kind of savior?  Did His associations mean his acceptance of clichés such as “As long as no one gets hurt what does it matter?” or “You do you.” No, quite to the contrary. 

According to the folks at The Gospel Coalition, “Jesus was a friend of sinners not because he winked at sin, ignored sin, or enjoyed light-hearted revelry with those engaged in immorality. Jesus was a friend of sinners in that he came to save sinners and was incredibly pleased to welcome sinners who were open to the gospel, sorry for their sins, and on their way to putting their faith in Him.” 

Jesus had an Invitational Open Door Policy

In many ways Jesus had an invitational open-door policy in order to bring healing to the most people possible. Eating with the tax collectors was not just a welcome aboard party for Levi, it was an invitation for all present to come and be healed. Since you are the hands and feet of Jesus present today, can you be the one to help keep the door open for all to come to Him? 

Lisa Miklos

Meditation

Who are the “least” in my community? Am I doing a good job being the hands and feet of Christ to the people who needs Christ’s love the most?

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Bible, Gospel, Lent, Lent, Mass Reflection, Uncategorized, Women's Ministry

Out of Love or Obligation?

Matthew 9:14-15

I am a pretty literal person. To me, passages this make sense because we are reading the scriptures with post-Resurrection knowledge. We know who Jesus is and that the disciples are right to feast with the Lord – the bridegroom. We know what Jesus means when he says that “the days will come when the bridegroom is taken away” (Mt 9:15).

Something more has stuck with me with this passage though, and it reminds me of the story of the Prodigal Son, which we will read a little later during Lent. What comes to mind was a question a priest asked in his homily a few years ago. 

If you will recall the parable, the older brother was miffed that the father had a fattened calf slaughtered in honor of his younger brother’s return from his perfidious sojourn, while he, the older son, had obeyed his father.  The father tells the older brother that all they have, has always been his to enjoy.  

Do you do things out of love or obligation?

The priest asked our congregation, “Do you do things out of love or only out of obligation?”  The older brother was fulfilling his duty out of obligation but not love; at least that’s how I understood the question. That struck me hard especially because I’m disciplined and dutiful.

I see a parallel here. The followers of John the Baptist are asking Jesus why his disciples were not fasting in accordance with the customs of the day, but  Jesus knew that the time for fasting would be once he was crucified.  It’s almost as if he is stating that there is no need to fast out of obligation because there will come a time for all who believe in him to fast out of love for him. 

Why do you fast?

This begs the question, are you fasting out of love for Jesus, or out of obligation? Are you attending Mass because these are days of obligation, or because you love the Lord and want to sit at his feet and partake of his banquet?

Now, acting out of obligation is not necessarily wrong. Often times we do the right thing out of obligation. We may refrain from gossip, for example, because we feel obliged not to damage another’s reputation but not because we actually have much regard for someone. It’s a harder pursuit to refrain from gossiping about someone because you love that person as a sister or brother in Christ, made in the image and likeness of God.

To act out of obligation is good. To love is better.

What have you chosen to offer during Lent?  Are you fasting from something? Are you adding something more to your plate, such an increased prayer time?  Or perhaps you pledged to donate to a food drive by buying a few extra groceries for the food bank each time you go to the commissary?  Whatever it is you choose to do, strive to do it because of love?

Aly Tugaoen


Meditation

Lord Jesus, During Lent I have given up or taken on (name your lenten offerings), help me to make these sacrifices out of love for you for my neighbor. When I’m weak in my offerings, remind me that you gave your entire life freely out of love for me, your unworthy servant. Bless my obedience to this lenten sacrifice and increase my love for you. Amen.


Lent Devotional 2021
A devotional for Lent 2021 with daily Gospel Reflections Download HERE

Get your copy of Joyful Momentum HERE
Lent Devotional 2021
Lent, Lent, Uncategorized

A Time to Grow – Lent 2021 Devotional

Friends, Your response to the Good Tidings 2020 Advent Devotional was so generous that I decided to compile another devotional for Lent. Several faithful, talented, and loving friends helped me to write this Lent devotional, which I’ve named A Time to Grow. I hope that you grow this Lent. If you’re subscribed to the blog, you’ll receive a new Gospel reflection to your inbox daily. You will also be able to download A Time to Grow as a free e-book.

St. Gregory the Great preached that scripture “grows with its readers.”

When we pray (or at least when I pray), I don’t hear an audible voice of God speaking to me. But when we pray with scripture, we’re opening an opportunity for the Word to speak to us. 

I have a friend who is a Baptist preacher, and he looked at me one day and said, “You know, Elizabeth, we Baptists believe that the Holy Spirit is actually present in the words we preach.” 

“Of course the Holy Spirit can be present in preaching,” I thought. He paused for a while. Then he said, “So I can see how Jesus could be present in the Eucharist.” I responded, “Welcome to the Catholic Church, friend!”

Scripture grows with the reader, and we grow with scripture, too. 

What might God’s Word have in store for you this Lent? 

We can read scripture alone, but it’s helpful to do so in community with others. “As iron sharpens iron, so one person sharpens another” (Pv 27:17). To that end, I’m grateful that so many women have collaborated with me to create this Lent Devotional. I encourage you to read the Gospel daily, take time for meditation, and hop on over to the Joyful Momentum group on Facebook, where we can talk about how God is revealing himself to us through his Word. I pray that you have a diligent, loving, and fruitful Lent. 

Elizabeth Tomlin

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